Managing Stress Symptoms – How to Cope Better with Stress

Stress affects everyone. No-one is completely immune. So what sorts of factors determine who is more vulnerable to the harmful effects of stress?

Stress can affect anyone. People of every race, every age, and all socio-economic classes experience stress.  Parents, men, women, retirees, baby boomers, teens, even children all experience different kinds of stress.  In fact no-one is completely immune although everyone experiences stress at different levels.

You may have heard that stress is subjective – it is.  Even if two people experience exactly the same situation, one person might not find it terribly stressful whilst the other might be hugely traumatized. This is because some people are naturally able to cope with stress-charged situations better than others.  And these fortunate people do not tend to suffer with long-term stress effects and are also less likely to suffer long term health than their more stressed out friends.   

So what sorts of factors determine who is more vulnerable to the harmful effects of stress? After all, financial strains, job related stress, relationships, parenting, illness and life transitions and many other stressful events affect just about everyone. So what kinds of people weather the storms of stress well? And who does not?

The answer is actually quite clear. 

The people who are most resistant to stress and who deal well with it are usually those who have a strong support network in place, such as friends they can talk to, family close by who can offer practical help etc.   The people who cope well with stress also tend to be those who actively relax, are by and large fit and usually eat a balanced diet.

In contrast, the people who have the most trouble dealing with stress are generally the ones who:

  • do not have a strong support network of friends and family;
  • are poorly nourished for whatever reason;
  • are suffering generally poorer health, including any untreated illnesses;
  • do not get enough sleep or exercise;
  • any combination of these (new parents take note!)  

People who are hit with many stressful events in rapid succession may also have trouble coping with stress.  These people, whether young or old are less likely to handle stress well, and more likely to suffer more from the effects of stress.

While no one can avoid all stress all the time, stress does affect people differently. The ability to handle stress well is closely linked with good general health, a good support network and experiencing stress as a relatively isolated event rather than an ongoing occurrence.

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Only Losers Get Stressed

I think that there is a stigma against stress.  Maybe I’m wrong but when I talk to people about it, it seems to me that women will admit to being stressed, but dismiss it as just being the way life is; and men either don’t admit to feeling it at all, or see it as a macho, positive thing – whether it is or not.

How can we ever allow ourselves to benefit from stress relief if we are too scared to admit to being compromised by stress? 

Stress can affect anyone.  People of every race, gender, age, ability, culture, socio-economic class etc, all experience stress.  No one is immune. 

But different people do experience stress at different levels.  What one person finds super stressful, another might simply glide through.  And everyone handles stress situations differently – meaning some people are less likely than others to suffer chronic or long-term effects of stress.

There are many factors that determine who is more vulnerable to the harmful effects of stress.  Financial strains, job related stress, relationships and parenting can all take a toll.  So can illness and life transitions and other stressful events.  Some people handle stress extremely well.  They mitigate its effects well.  These people are usually those who have a strong support network in place.

The people who often has more trouble dealing with stress are those who don’t have a strong support network such as friends and family.  This is the number 1 cause of stress in adult women!  Other high risk stress groups are those who don’t get enough to eat, are in poor health or who are sleep deprived (Note – new mothers can fall into every one of these groups and stay-at-home parents are continually identified as amongst the most highly stressed groups!). 

People who are hit with many stressful events in rapid succession may also have trouble coping with stress.  These people, whether young or old are less likely to handle stress well, and more likely to suffer more from the effects of stress.

While no one can avoid all stress all the time, stress does affect people differently.  The ability to bounce back seems to lie in general health, support and stress as a relatively isolated event rather than an ongoing occurrence.

Recognize when you have moved into a “high at-risk” group and change your actions to incorporate adequate stress relief measures for the phase of life you are in now.